US State & Local Work

When communities are threatened by new or existing biomass power plants, they turn to PFPI for the information they need to fight back.

PFPI responds to requests from communities and advocacy groups from around the country for input on a wide range of issues, including individual facility air permits, rebutting biomass industry claims, greenhouse gas emissions accounting, and state policies related to biomass bailouts and subsidies.  We also engage directly in legal and regulatory proceedings and legislative advocacy. See more about our state campaigns and featured reports below. 

Key resources:
The Bioenergy Boom from the Federal Stimulus: Outcomes and Lessons (2018)
Maine Bioenergy at the Crossroads: Costs of a Failing Industry (2017)
Trees, Trash, and Toxics: How Biomass Energy Has Become the New Coal (2014)
Burning Money: Biomass Gasification and the DOE Loan Guarantee Program (2013)

Vermont, wake up and do the math!

Many public officials don’t seem to recognize the threat that large-scale biomass plants and wood pellet manufacturing plants present to the State’s forests.

All posts, Carbon emissions, Forests, States, Vermont

Manomet didn’t go far enough

The Manomet study relies on a number of assumptions that minimize the calculation of net carbon emissions from biomass, meaning that actual emissions are likely significantly greater than the study concludes.

All posts, Carbon emissions, Massachusetts, States

Massachusetts Manomet Study: Biomass Worse Than Coal for 40 Years

The only independent, multi-stakeholder study of the carbon impacts of burning trees to generate electricity found that it would take 40 years of forest regrowth just to get to parity in carbon pollution with burning coal for those same four decades. To get to parity with natural gas would take almost a century.

All posts, Carbon emissions, Forests, Massachusetts, Reports

Washington State’s Carbon Ponzi Scheme

Acting as if the carbon emitted from trees cut and burned here will be sequestered by trees over there makes as much sense as letting a coal plant write off its emissions because it’s not cutting trees over there, either.

All posts, Carbon emissions, States, Washington