Climate Week 2019 Screenings of “Burned: Are Trees the New Coal?”

PFPI hosts screenings of “Burned: Are Trees the New Coal?” at Climate Week NYC 2019

On Tuesday, September 24, join PFPI for a one-hour event exploring the impact of the wood-burning industry on forests, communities, and the climate, featuring the award-winning documentary, BURNED: Are Trees the New Coal?

Two Chances to Join Us!
Two one-hour sessions will be held at 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm, and 3:00 pm – 4:00 pm on Tuesday September 24. Each will include:
  • 30-minute screening of BURNED: Are Trees the New Coal?, a powerful documentary that explores the science, policy, and activism around the forest bioenergy and wood pellet industries.
  • 30-minute discussion about the impact of the exploding biomass and wood pellet industries on forests and the climate, including an overview of the lawsuit filed against the European Union for promoting forest biomass as climate-friendly (www.eubiomasscase.org).  Panel: Burned filmmaker Lisa Merton, Dr. Mary Booth (coordinator of EU lawsuit and Director of the Partnership for Policy Integrity), and Nick Bell, forest campaigner with SOS Forêt France. We welcome your participation!
Admission
Free and open to the public, but an RSVP here is recommended.
1:30 pm Screening and Panel Discussion
Burning Forests to Solve Climate Change?
Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2019, 1:30pm – 2:30pm 3:00 pm Screening and Panel Discussion
Forest Biomass: A Climate Non-Solution
Tuesday, Sept. 24, 2019, 3:00pm – 4:00pm
Event Location
Park Avenue Screening Room
500 Park Avenue (at 59th St.)
1st Floor, enter through the lobby
Directly north on Park Avenue from the Nature Hub at Convene 101 For More Information:
For details, directions, or the RSVP, contact Jenni Haley at jhaley@pfpi.net.
About the Film
Winner of the 2017 Audience Choice Award at the American Conservation Film Festival, BURNED: Are Trees the New Coal? has been selected for a number of juried film festivals in the U.S. and is currently being campaigned. Through interviews with activists, experts, and citizens, along with footage from the U.S., E.U., and U.K., the film interweaves the science of climate change, escalating energy-policy disputes, dynamics of forest ecology, biomass industry practices, the need for rural jobs, and work by activists and citizens to protect forests. For more information, visit https://burnedthemovie.com/.

Presented by the Partnership for Policy Integrity, this event is part of the Food, Land and Nature-Based Solutions program of Climate Week NYC.

 

Partnership for Policy Integrity